Would They Follow You Up The Mountain? 6 Ways to Inspire and Lead a Culture of Collaboration

blog_June_26_2015

Good Leaders and Managers require a lot of self-awareness and self-motivation, however, Great Leaders know that their behavior towards others is crucial to employee engagement and commitment. You can provide employees with wonderful perks and benefits (dental!) but if you don’t empathize, listen, and provide a platform for others to be heard your team may start looking for someone who will.

Below are 6 ways that great Leaders help create and build great teams from our Expert Speakers

Give yourself a point for each one you execute on a regular basis and review your score at the end:

1. “I learned that you don’t inspire your teammates by showing them how amazing you are. You inspire them by showing them how amazing they are.” Firefighter Robyn Benincasa award winning Speaker on Teamwork.

2. “It’s nice to be important, but it’s more important to be nice.” John Cassis Speaker on Leading Change

3. “What we do is try to lay out for people that what we find to be fairly common sense in our personal lives – saying thank you and appreciating people – somehow gets lost in the course of normal business.” Chester Elton Speaker and Author of All-IN

4. “First, tell the truth. It’s simple and sometimes hard to do.” Marilyn Tam Speaker on Leadership and Diversity

5. “When you truly listen, you let go of formulating your response while someone else is speaking. Then, you can easily slip into his or her shoes.” Brian Biro Speaker on Change

6. “Most people are generally reasonable and can rally around an idea that wasn’t their own as long as they know they’ve had a chance to weigh in.” Patrick Lencioni Guru on Leadership

 

  • 6 out of 6: They would follow you over the mountain and every mountain after that.
  • 5 out of 6: They would follow you fairly close to the top of the mountain and want to go further.
  • 4 out of 6: They would follow you half way up the mountain and then give a serious think to going further.
  • 3 out of 6: They would slowly follow you halfway up your mountain but once there they are going to evaluate you and other mountains to climb.
  • 2 out of 6: They would listen to your idea about following you up that mountain, nod their heads, and when you are on the mountain they’ll email you.
  • 1 out of 6: It’s your mountain and you’re the one who wants to go up it, they’re leaving at 5 PM.

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